Friday, April 01, 2011

Six Ways to Make Yourself Easy to Hire


I've been searching for folks to work with lately. In particular, we bought access to view résumés using monster.com's resume search. For $700, I can see all the details you've uploaded to monster.com.

I'm a programmer, not a "Human Resources Person". But I'll bet I'm similar to many other folks looking to hire these days, so I'm playing the role of "hiring manager" even though I don't manage anybody. I'm just trying to find more peers that I want to work with. These are my opinions on how to make yourself easy to hire, especially if you're in technical fields.

1. List every skill in detail


People are searching for resumes based largely on keywords. So you need to be sure your resume includes the keywords they're seeking. Because the online resume is a long, searchable document, there's no downside in making it long.

Ideally, list everything you've ever known how to do, and then indicate what your current level of familiarity is with it.

B. Make your resume, transcript, and evidence of certifications easy to get.


When you're emailing a "hiring manager," email a PDF of your resume, transcripts, etc., to that person. Don't make the hiring person have to dig around through files to find these details. And there's no downside to sending along a scanned copy of your diploma if you're going to have to provide it later.

On monster.com, along with your resume, post your college transcripts, certifications, to monster -- or provide links so people can easily get them.

By providing evidence of these certifications easily via email when you contact them, making it very easy for the hiring manager to get them, you're reducing the risk. If somebody sends me their diploma today, on the first email contact, I'm less concerned that they're not going to be able to provide the college transcripts after a job offer is made.

III. Send examples of your work


Provide examples of the sorts of things you're able to do. In software, send along software examples. If the job involves writing, send along writing examples. If the job involves network designs, send along examples of network design documentation. If the job involves troubleshooting, give examples of troubleshooting scenarios.

100\sub{2}. Make your online resume look good


Monster.com shows an HTML-rendered view of the resume. I've seen some that were obviously converted automatically from MS Word documents, and the result was just barely readable. I've also seen clear evidence that the candidate was working hard to make their resume look good in the online view.

I usually don't even download the MS Word resume file; I just save the HTML view. I hate having to start up MS Word anyway.

0x05. Be more funny!


Everybody wants to work with friendly, fun people. So you might as well be friendly and fun right from the start. Unfortunately, "professionalism" (i.e., being nondescript and unexceptional) prevails.

sqrt(36). Be active


I can't imagine why a person involved in networking or software could be idle, even if they're not employed. Get involved in some projects, such as open-source projects. If nothing else, improve their documentation. Or start a new project to write a paper for a conference. And then, if you're not fully employed, list that activity on your resume as what you're doing now.

1 comment:

Phoebe Bright said...

Refreshing take on an often repeated subject. Thanks for the tips.