Monday, August 27, 2007

Something funny about legal work agreements

I've noticed something funny about many of the legal work agreements
I see between contractor and contractee: they're really confusing and
unclear. The whole purpose of writing down an agreement is to clarify
things, but some of the agreements I see obviously have not been
proof-read carefully.

In some cases, it's clear that someone cut-and-paste info from one
source into the contract. On the face, that might be perfectly fine.
But it becomes obvious that that's what happened because other
irrelevant details work their way into the agreement. Or section
headings will show up, mis-formatted and stuck together with the main
paragraph.

I guess it happens because people are in a huge rush to get the
agreement in place. Ultimately, as the person who actually does the
work, I have to make a guess about what was intended. Usually, I get
better guesses by actually talking to the people involved rather than
by reading what they wrote (or cut-and-pasted, as the case may be).

Dealing with all the flexibility in Java

Java systems are often very flexible. There are so many ways to put
things together! There's not just one way to manage your Root CA
certificates, for example; no one keystore may have all the info you
need, or it may not; it may require a password, and should in some
cases, but doesn't have to. It's nuts!

I wish I knew a way to cope well with the complexity of such
flexible, configurable systems.

Saturday, August 04, 2007

The wedding programme, and our vows

I'm at a friends wedding now. I'm about the 50th to arrive, and the start time is 20 minutes hence.

I have the program. This is of the short variety, just briefly documenting the steps, and listing the people involved It's easy to read in just a couple of minutes. It's a normal program.

Hayden and I did a longer program. It included the full text of our vows, which we had written.

On reflection, our wedding guests may have had a lot of time to read those vows.

I wonder if they raised any questions, or what people thought in general.

Indignance, a popular Hobby

My local newspaper, the releigh news and observer, is one of me primary sources on the culture I live near. From it, i'm learning that angst is a popular modern hobby.

For example, one article discussed the problem of people whose earbud-type headphones on ipods were making noise audible to others.

An article today describes a pile of broken concrete blocks near a road that's considered ugly. The debris is not in the road.

These articles follow others i've heard (on npr) or read of the same theme. The idea seems to be: i'm annoyed by something, I have the right to be annoyed, you shouldn't contribute to that thing, and somebody ought to do something about it.